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Japanese culture "public bath"

Posted on October 12, 2020

Public baths are a Japanese culture that has been loved for a long time. There are many public baths that have hot springs. One of the attractions is that there is a public bath where you can soak in the hot springs at the end of work without going out.Ideal for healing everyday fatigue.When it gets cold, I miss the warm public bath.

photo by @minamoto_yu

This is Minamoto-yu in Kyoto.

It’s a wonderful public bath with a long history.

photo by @minamoto_yu

photo by @minamoto_yu

photo by @minamoto_yu

The exterior of the palace like a shrine or temple, the magnificent Mt. Fuji paint painting on the wall, the tile paintings of various motifs, the cute goodwill, and the public bath that retains such good old Japanese culture are also beautiful, and recently. Then, the number of fashionable public baths incorporating contemporary art is increasing.

This is Matsunoyu in Tokyo.

photo by @shinbotch

photo by @shinbotch

The attraction of public baths is that they can connect with people. It is not uncommon for people to naturally have conversations and get to know each other by soaking in a bathtub with a stranger. Rather than going to a drinking party, it’s a fascinating place where you can improve your relationships as if you were no longer a barrier to people. I often see young people and elderly people talking naturally, who usually do not have a chance to talk.

This is Tsukimiyu in Tokyo.

photo by @naowalkon1127

photo by @naowalkon1127

This is Hananoyu inKyoto.

photo by @k.been15

photo by @k.been15

The attraction of public baths is that they can connect with people. It is not uncommon for people to naturally have conversations and get to know each other by soaking in a bathtub with a stranger. Rather than going to a drinking party, it’s a fascinating place where you can improve your relationships as if you were no longer a barrier to people. I often see young people and elderly people talking naturally, who usually do not have a chance to talk.

 This is Yunoraku Daitabashi in Tokyo.

photo by @yujikan.110

Milk after the bath is a staple, but in addition to carbonated drinks such as coke and sports drinks, alcoholic beverages such as beer are also popular. The drinks offered differ depending on the public bath, so if you go to various public baths, you may discover something new.

photo by @yujikan.110

Please experience the good old culture of Japan.

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